Boy Scouts delay decision on admitting gays
by David Crary, Associated Press and Nomaan Merchant, Associated Press
February 06, 2013 01:25 PM | 867 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Scott Hines, scoutmaster for Troop 16 and his son Garrett, pray during a prayer vigil in the First Baptist Church Moores Lane in Texarkana, Texas on Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013. Members of the troop, parents, and others prayed that the Boy Scouts of America would continue to keep their policy of excluding gay scouts and scoutmasters. The national executive board of the BSA began closed meetings on Monday to discus the policy. (AP Photo/Texarkana Gazette, Adam Sacasa)
Scott Hines, scoutmaster for Troop 16 and his son Garrett, pray during a prayer vigil in the First Baptist Church Moores Lane in Texarkana, Texas on Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013. Members of the troop, parents, and others prayed that the Boy Scouts of America would continue to keep their policy of excluding gay scouts and scoutmasters. The national executive board of the BSA began closed meetings on Monday to discus the policy. (AP Photo/Texarkana Gazette, Adam Sacasa)
slideshow
IRVING, Texas (AP) — Faced with intense pressure from two flanks, the Boy Scouts of America said Wednesday it needed more time for consultations before deciding whether to move away from its divisive policy of excluding gays as scouts or adult leaders.

Possible changes in the policy — such as a proposal to allow sponsors of local troops to decide for themselves on gay membership — will not be voted on until the organization’s annual meeting in May, the national executive board said at the conclusion of closed-door deliberations.

As the board met over three days at a hotel in Irving, near Dallas, it became clear that the proposed change would be unacceptable to large numbers of Scouting families and advocacy groups on the left and right. Gay-rights supporters said no Scout units should be allowed to exclude gays, while some conservatives, including religious leaders whose churches sponsor troops, warned of mass defections if the ban was eased.

“In the past two weeks, Scouting has received an outpouring of feedback from the American public,” said the BSA’s national spokesman, Deron Smith. “It reinforces how deeply people care about Scouting and how passionate they are about the organization.”

Smith said the executive board “concluded that due to the complexity of this issue, the organization needs time for a more deliberate review of its membership policy.” The board will prepare a resolution to be voted on by the 1,400 voting members of the national council at a meeting in Grapevine, Texas, he said.

The BSA announced last week it was considering allowing scout troops to decide whether to allow gay membership. That news placed a spotlight on the executive board meeting that began Monday in Irving, where the BSA headquarters is located, but the deliberations were closed to the news media and the public.

Early reaction to the delay from gay-rights supporters was harshly critical of the BSA.

“A Scout is supposed to be brave, and the Boy Scouts failed to be brave today,” said Jennifer Tyrrell, a Ohio mother ousted from her post as a Cub Scout volunteer because she’s a lesbian. “The Boy Scouts had the chance to help countless young people and devoted parents, but they’ve failed us yet again.”

Brad Hankins, campaign director of Scouts for Equality, said the delay would have a direct impact on young men already in the scouting movement.

“By postponing this decision, thousands of currently active Scouts still remain uncertain about their future in the program and are shamed into silence. We understand that this change is a huge paradigm shift for some, but this isn’t a religious issue. It’s simply one of human morality, and that is something common to all faiths.”

About 70 percent of all Scout units are sponsored by religious denominations, including many by conservative faiths that have supported the ban, such as the Roman Catholic Church, the Southern Baptist Convention and the Mormons’ Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Michael Purdy, a Mormon church spokesman, said the BSA “acted wisely in delaying its decision until all voices can be heard on this important moral issue.”

The National Catholic Committee on Scouting said it would join in the BSA’s consultations over the coming months. Whatever the outcome, the committee said, “Catholic chartered units will continue to provide leaders who promote and live Catholic values.”

Hundreds of conservative supporters of the ban meanwhile held a rally and prayer vigil at the BSA headquarters, carrying signs reading, “Don’t Invite Sin Into the Camp,” and “BSA please resist Satan’s test. Uphold the ban.”

Scoutmaster Darrel Russell, of Weatherford, took his wife and five of their seven children to the rally. Russell, 47, said having gays in the scouting movement would be like mixing boys and girls.

“The whole idea is to protect our boys at all costs,” Russell said, warning that if the ban is lifted “we’re shutting down our troop.”

President Barack Obama, an opponent of the policy, and Texas Gov. Rick Perry, an Eagle Scout who supports it, both have weighed in.

“My attitude is that gays and lesbians should have access and opportunity the same way everybody else does in every institution and walk of life,” said Obama, who as U.S. president is the honorary president of BSA, in a Sunday interview with CBS.

Perry, the author of the book “On My Honor: Why the American Values of the Boy Scouts Are Worth Fighting For,” said in a speech Saturday that “to have popular culture impact 100 years of their standards is inappropriate.”

The board faces several choices, none of which is likely to quell the controversy. Standing pat would go against the public wishes of two high-profile board members — Ernst & Young CEO James Turley and AT&T Inc. CEO Randall Stephenson — who run companies with nondiscrimination policies and have said they would work from within to change the Scouts’ policy.

Conservatives have warned of mass defections if Scouting allows gay membership to be determined by troops. Local and regional leaders, as well as the leadership of churches that sponsor troops, would be forced to consider their own policies. And policy opponents who delivered four boxes of signatures to BSA headquarters Monday said they wouldn’t be satisfied by only a partial acceptance of gay scouts and leaders.

“We don’t want to see Scouting gerrymandered into blue and red districts,” said Brad Hankins, campaign director of Scouts for Equality.

Nancy Deveau accompanied her 10-year-old son, wearing his scout’s uniform, to the rally at scouting HQ. She said she doesn’t want Scout leaders to drop the ban.

“We wanted to pray for our Boy Scout leaders to keep our values,” said Deveau, of Mansfield.

___

Crary reported from New York City.

___

Associated Press writer Jamie Stengle in Irving, Texas, and Brady McCombs in Salt Lake City contributed to this report.

BC-EU—Austria-Sleep in the City/570

Eds: With AP Photos

Tired in Vienna? Nap for a price at new studio

GEORGE JAHN,Associated Press

VIENNA (AP) — One sleepy little side street in Vienna just got sleepier.

Tucked behind a Gothic church and surrounded by Renaissance-era houses, a new studio is offering deal-makers, movers and shakers and foot-sore tourists respite at a price: a half-hour power nap for 11 euros ($15).

But Reflexia is more than just a place for shut-eye. The establishment’s massive arches and thick walls built centuries ago act as if they were made specifically to protect from the outside world, and visitors who cross its threshold are offered soft mood music; a heaping plate of prosciutto with chunky bread; coffee, tea and soft drinks, and a wake-up that is personal — and gentle.

“People know sleep as a need but not as a product,” owner Peter Schurin says. “Our task is to change that in some ways.”

Schurin describes his establishment as “a fitness center for the spirit,” and his business model might be well-timed, even if the Austrian capital is anything but an edgy city that never sleeps.

Most stores here are closed on Sundays. On Fridays, the work day ends at 3 p.m., or earlier, judging from the traffic jams clogging the main arteries out of the city of 1.8 million. In fact, Vienna regularly tops Mercier surveys as the world’s most livable city in part because of its outsized calm factor.

At the same time, Austria’s status in Europe as an “Island of the Blessed” is being eroded by the kind of work-related stress common to other Western societies.

A study last year involving doctors, unions and employers estimated that stress-related illnesses are costing Austria’s economy 7 billion euros — almost $9.5 billion a year — in treatment and absences of its 3.7-million strong work force. Michael Musalek, head of Vienna’s Anton Proksch medical institute, says the number of burn-out victims “is steadily growing.”

Enter Schurin and his establishment.

Services at Reflexia range in cost and substance. The 11-euro, half-hour cat nap takes place in a dim room where black leather loungers are separated by Japanese folding screens; a one-hour snooze in a private chamber can be purchased for 40 euros ($60).

Those who can’t sleep can play computer games, grab a book off the club room’s shelf or just sit back and relax with a drink and a bite for 6 euros ($8) an hour.

The only thing missing so far? Sleepy customers.

On Tuesday, a day after the grand opening, candles were burning and the Italian ham was waiting — but the couches were empty except for one.

On it was Gundula Schatz, who described herself as both a client and a prospective partner looking to offer yoga courses at the establishment. Asked how her couch felt, she replied “like in seventh heaven!”

Schurin says he’s patient.

“While we were still building with all the mess and dust, people passed by and saw the word ‘sleep’ ... and turned to me and said, ‘Can I sleep here?’ And I said ‘Yes, but please wait until we’re open.’

“Austrians are cautious people,” he added. “It takes them a while to get used to new ideas.”

But the concept left at least one passer-by cold Tuesday.

“I sleep on the job,” said Rolf Bachler, when asked if he was in need of a power-nap.

Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
*We welcome your comments on the stories and issues of the day and seek to provide a forum for the community to voice opinions. All comments are subject to moderator approval before being made visible on the website but are not edited. The use of profanity, obscene and vulgar language, hate speech, and racial slurs is strictly prohibited. Advertisements, promotions, spam, and links to outside websites will also be rejected. Please read our terms of service for full guides