Disabled parents fight for children
by David Crary
Associated Press Writer
November 25, 2012 12:41 AM | 601 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Brooke Croteau, an assistant to Carrie Ann Lucas, a disabled mother of four disabled adopted children, helps Adrianne, 13, one of Lucas’ children, into a vehicle as the family leaves their home in Windsor, Colo., to attend an adoption hearing Nov. 14. Anthony, 11, Lucas’ intellectually disabled adopted son, is at right.<br>The Associated Press
Brooke Croteau, an assistant to Carrie Ann Lucas, a disabled mother of four disabled adopted children, helps Adrianne, 13, one of Lucas’ children, into a vehicle as the family leaves their home in Windsor, Colo., to attend an adoption hearing Nov. 14. Anthony, 11, Lucas’ intellectually disabled adopted son, is at right.
The Associated Press
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Millions of Americans with disabilities have gained innumerable rights and opportunities since Congress passed landmark legislation on their behalf in 1990. And yet advocates say barriers and bias still abound when it comes to one basic human right: to be a parent.

A Kansas City, Mo., couple had their daughter taken into custody by the state two days after her birth because both parents were blind. A Chicago mother, because she is quadriplegic, endured an 18-month legal battle to keep custody of her young son. A California woman paid an advance fee to an adoption agency, then was told she might be unfit to adopt because she has cerebral palsy.

Such cases are found nationwide, according to a new report by the National Council on Disability, an independent federal agency. The 445-page document is viewed by the disability-rights community as by far the most comprehensive ever on the topic — simultaneously an encyclopedic accounting of the status quo and an emotional plea for change.

“Parents with disabilities continue to be the only distinct community that has to fight to retain — and sometimes gain — custody of their own children,” said autism-rights activist Ari Ne’eman, a member of the council. “The need to correct this unfair bias could not be more urgent or clear.”

The U.S. legal system is not adequately protecting the rights of parents with disabilities, the report says, citing child welfare laws in most states allowing courts to determine that a parent is unfit on the basis of a disability. Terminating parental rights on such grounds “clearly violates” the intent of the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act, the report contends.

Child-welfare experts, responding to the report, said they shared its goals of expanding supports for disabled parents and striving to keep their families together. But they said removals of children from their parents — notably in cases of significant intellectual disabilities — are sometimes necessary even if wrenching.

“At the end of the day, the child’s interest in having permanence and stability has to be the priority over the interests of their parents,” said Judith Schagrin, a veteran child-welfare administrator in Maryland.

In the bulk of difficult cases, ensuring vital support for disabled parents may be all that’s needed to eliminate risks or lessen problems, many advocates say.

The new report, titled “Rocking the Cradle: Ensuring the Rights of Parents with Disabilities and Their Children,” estimates that 6.1 million U.S. children have disabled parents. It says these parents are more at risk than other parents of losing custody of their children, including removal rates as high as 80 percent for parents with psychiatric or intellectual disabilities.

Parents with all types of disabilities — physical or mental — are more likely to lose custody of their children after divorce, have more difficulty accessing assisted-reproductive treatments to bear children, and face significant barriers to adopting children, the report says.
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