Festival serves up Canton’s best tomatoes
by TCT Staff
July 25, 2013 12:00 AM | 1151 views | 0 0 comments | 26 26 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Tomatoes took center stage at the Tomato Sandwich Festival on Saturday, along with homemade bread. First place for best tomatoes went to Carney Farms and second and third place went to Granny Matt Farms. The winning Best Homemade Bread entry went to Canton resident Roy Taylor for his Sourdough Bread with Kamut.














<br>
Special to the Cherokee 
Tribune
Tomatoes took center stage at the Tomato Sandwich Festival on Saturday, along with homemade bread. First place for best tomatoes went to Carney Farms and second and third place went to Granny Matt Farms. The winning Best Homemade Bread entry went to Canton resident Roy Taylor for his Sourdough Bread with Kamut.
Special to the Cherokee Tribune
slideshow
The Canton Community Gardens sponsored a Tomato Sandwich Festival on Saturday with winners chosen for best backyard tomatoes and best homemade bread.

Once the winners were chosen, the crowd tried samples of tomato sandwiches made with the entries. Judges were Canton Mayor Gene Hobgood, Bill Grant and state Rep. Mandi Ballinger (R-Canton.)

First place for best tomatoes went to Carney Farms and second and third place went to Granny Matt Farms.

The winning Best Homemade Bread entry went to Canton resident Roy Taylor for his Sourdough Bread with Kamut.

Sourdough Bread

(Activated starter method)



Activated starter:

Start in the morning the day before and feed your base amount starter with ¼ cup flour to 1/3 cup water mixed into the starter from the refrigerator. Leave in bowl covered for the day. Stir occasionally.

Before bed mix 2 ¼ cups of water to 3 cups of bread flour and ½ cup of the activated starter. Cover and leave in bowl on counter overnight. (Bread flour can be made up of all white or a combination of white and other flours. This year’s winning bread had 1 ½ cups of ground Kamut, one of the ancient wheat flours.

In the morning, add 1 tablespoon of salt and 2½ cups of bread flour. Let rest for 30 to 45 minutes.

Knead this until it loosens into a uniform sticky dough (5 to 7 minutes) using the final ½ cup of flour as you do. Set in bowl and cover for an hour or so until doubled. Use oven proofing method if the kitchen is cold.

Remove dough and using the folding method, fold in thirds from each direction at least three times. Place back in bowl for another hour. Remove and fold in thirds (lightly) one direction and then the other. That should leave a good looking loaf form. Keep thirding if you think you need to, to get that good looking loaf. Place good side down in floured towel lined basket and cover for an hour.

Heat oven to 500 degrees for 30 minutes during this final rise. Ease bread onto prepared pan, good side up. Slash with razor. Slide into oven. Spritz oven with mist every 2 to 3 minutes for the first 15 minutes of baking. Reduce heat to 400. Slip an additional tray under the cooking sheet pan and bake for an additional 35 to 40 minutes until internal bread temperature reaches 200 Fahrenheit. Cool on rack before slicing.



How to make a dough starter from King Arthur flour

The easiest and most successful method of making your own starter is to combine water, flour, and a tablespoon (or packet) of active dry “domestic” yeast which is available at any grocery store. By letting this brew sit for several days as you would with a dried sourdough starter, the domestic yeast will go “wild” and develop the familiar tang of its truly wild cousins. You’ll probably catch some wild yeast in the process as well.

2 cups warm water

1 tablespoon of sugar or honey (optional)

1 tablespoon or packet active dry yeast

2 cups King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour

DIRECTIONS:

Pour the water into a 3- to 4-quart glass or ceramic container or bowl, and add dissolve the sugar or honey and the yeast in that order. Stir in the flour gradually. Cover the jar or bowl with a clean dishcloth and place it somewhere warm. By using a dishcloth instead of plastic wrap, you’ll allow any wild yeast in the area to infiltrate and begin to work with the domestic yeast which itself is beginning to develop “wild” characteristics and flavors.

The mixture will begin to bubble and brew almost immediately. Let it work anywhere from two to five days, stirring it about once a day as it will separate. When the bubbling has subsided and a yeasty, sour aroma has developed, stir your starter once more and refrigerate it until you are ready to use it. The starter should have the consistency of pancake batter.



Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
*We welcome your comments on the stories and issues of the day and seek to provide a forum for the community to voice opinions. All comments are subject to moderator approval before being made visible on the website but are not edited. The use of profanity, obscene and vulgar language, hate speech, and racial slurs is strictly prohibited. Advertisements, promotions, spam, and links to outside websites will also be rejected. Please read our terms of service for full guides