Pa. prosecutor: Steroids found in Reid’s room
by Michael Rubinkam, Associated Press
December 17, 2012 03:50 PM | 689 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
This July 26, 2007 file photo shows Garrett Reid leaving a courtroom in Norristown, Pa., after pleading guilty to drug and traffic offenses. A Pennsylvania prosecutor said Monday, Dec. 17, 2012, that his investigation into the fatal heroin overdose of Garrett Reid, the oldest son of Philadelphia Eagles coach Andy Reid, revealed there were steroids in his room the day he died. (AP Photo/Mark Stehle, File)
This July 26, 2007 file photo shows Garrett Reid leaving a courtroom in Norristown, Pa., after pleading guilty to drug and traffic offenses. A Pennsylvania prosecutor said Monday, Dec. 17, 2012, that his investigation into the fatal heroin overdose of Garrett Reid, the oldest son of Philadelphia Eagles coach Andy Reid, revealed there were steroids in his room the day he died. (AP Photo/Mark Stehle, File)
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EASTON, Pa. (AP) — An investigation into the fatal heroin overdose of Garrett Reid, the oldest son of Philadelphia Eagles coach Andy Reid, revealed there were steroids in his room the day he died, a Pennsylvania prosecutor said Monday.

Northampton County District Attorney John Morganelli said that anabolic steroids were found in the room where Garrett Reid was staying when he overdosed on heroin Aug. 5 during Eagles training camp. Reid was helping the team’s strength and conditioning coach at the time of his death.

Morganelli said there was no evidence that Reid was giving the steroids to any Eagles players, and that investigators could not determine if the drugs were for Reid’s own use or for distribution.

Morganelli also said that steroids had nothing to do with Reid’s death.

Garrett Reid’s body was found in his dorm room at Lehigh University in Bethlehem. A coroner said the 29-year-old died of an accidental heroin overdose.

Lehigh University police were called to the dorm room around 7:20 a.m. on Aug. 5, arriving after Eagles team physician Dr. Omar Elkhamra had tried to revive him with a defibrillator.

Investigators searching his room found a used syringe and spoon, along with a gym bag filled with dozens of syringes and needles, many of them unopened, as well as 19 vials of an unknown liquid.

Testing revealed the vials contained four types of anabolic steroids, Morganelli said.

But said he did not have any evidence that Reid was distributing steroids to players.

Asked how aggressively his office and Lehigh University’s police department pursued the question, Morganelli said: "Lots of interviews were conducted by the police. And I can’t go into all of them, but all I can say is that we could not provide any evidence or substantiate that anybody in the Eagles organization was involved in this, or whether or not this was for his personal use. It was just undetermined."

He acknowledged the quantity found could have been intended for distribution, "but what I’m saying is I have no evidence of that, that there was any distribution by Mr. Reid, either here or anywhere else."

The prosecutor said he had not been in touch either with the NFL or the Eagles organization.

It wasn’t clear if Reid had steroids in his system at the time of his death. Northampton County Coroner Zachary Lysek did not immediately return a phone call

Once the corner determined that Reid had succumbed to heroin, investigators focused on learning who had supplied him with it, combing through Reid’s phone records to see who he was calling and texting before his death. But Morganelli said that probe ran into a dead end.

"It cannot be determined whether Mr. Reid obtained heroin here in the Lehigh Valley or brought it with him to training camp from elsewhere," Morganelli said, adding that Lehigh University police has closed the investigation.

Reid seemed to have rebounded from a long struggle with drug abuse.

He was sentenced to nearly two years in prison for a 2007 high-speed car crash that injured another driver. Police said Reid was high on heroin, and they found the drug and more than 200 pills in his car.

More recently, exercise and training had become his passion and he aspired to make it a career. At the time of his death, he had been helping strength and conditioning coach Barry Rubin. But an autopsy revealed his body showed signs of chronic drug use.

Reid’s younger brother, Britt, has also struggled with drug use and was arrested on the same day as Garrett in 2007 after a road-rage incident. Police discovered weapons and drugs in Britt Reid’s vehicle. He now works as a graduate assistant coach at Temple.

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