Pythons not Florida’s only invasive animal problem
by Jennifer Kay, Associated Press
February 15, 2013 02:20 PM | 1346 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
In this Feb. 14 , 2013 photo taken at the University of Florida campus in Davie, Fla., a young captured tegu-lizard is on display. While hunters stalked the elusive Burmese python through large swaths of Florida's Everglades over the last month, state and federal wildlife officials set traps for other animals menacing native wildlife in a fragile ecosystem. The python gets all the attention in Florida's sometimes weird animal kingdom and it's accused of decimating the populations of native mammals in the Everglades. (AP Photo/J Pat Carter)
In this Feb. 14 , 2013 photo taken at the University of Florida campus in Davie, Fla., a young captured tegu-lizard is on display. While hunters stalked the elusive Burmese python through large swaths of Florida's Everglades over the last month, state and federal wildlife officials set traps for other animals menacing native wildlife in a fragile ecosystem. The python gets all the attention in Florida's sometimes weird animal kingdom and it's accused of decimating the populations of native mammals in the Everglades. (AP Photo/J Pat Carter)
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Python Challenge Slideshow
In this Feb. 13, 2013 photo, non-native wildlife technician Jake Edwards sets a trap for tegu-liazards in the Florida everglades near Florida City, Fla. While hunters stalked the elusive Burmese python through large swaths of Florida's Everglades over the last month, state and federal wildlife officials set traps for other animals menacing native wildlife in a fragile ecosystem. (AP Photo/J Pat Carter)
view slideshow (8 images)
KEY LARGO, Fla. (AP) — The Burmese python has gotten a lot of attention lately, but it’s not the only invasive species that worries wildlife officials in Florida.

More than 1,500 people signed up to hunt pythons in the Everglades during the “Python Challenge” that ended Sunday. Meanwhile, state and federal wildlife agencies continued their efforts to control populations of other species that threaten native wildlife.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has finalized a plan to trap feral cats and other predators that roam federal wildlife refuges in the Florida Keys. The decline of two endangered mammals in those refuges is blamed largely on free-roaming cats.

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has specialized teams that trap black-and-white tegus (TE-goos), among other invasive reptiles. The lizard gorges on the eggs of native species.

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