Revolution Church plans more buildings after opening Canton facility in January
by Rebecca Johnston
June 08, 2013 12:00 AM | 4529 views | 0 0 comments | 20 20 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Pastor Jason Gerdes sits in the sanctuary of the newly completed Revolution Church on Friday morning. The congregation moved to the new facility at 125 Union Hill Trail in Canton in January, and already the services have expanded from two to three in the 800-seat auditorium. <br>Staff/Todd Hull
Pastor Jason Gerdes sits in the sanctuary of the newly completed Revolution Church on Friday morning. The congregation moved to the new facility at 125 Union Hill Trail in Canton in January, and already the services have expanded from two to three in the 800-seat auditorium.
Staff/Todd Hull
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CANTON — A new chapter has begun for Revolution Church with the opening of its new home in Canton.

Lead Pastor Jason Gerdes, 34, calls the church contemporary in many aspects but traditional in beliefs.

“The message is the same, the methods are different,” Gerdes said. “Traditional means a lot of different things and we are not a traditional church, but the structure of our service is traditional.”

Three services are available each Sunday at 8:15 a.m., 9:45 a.m. and 11:15 a.m.

The congregation moved to the new facility at 125 Union Hill Trail in Canton in January, and already the services have expanded from two to three in the 800-seat auditorium.

“Some people bristle at a church having buildings and part of our heart is not just about a building where people come but in engaging the city. We are really praying about having an outreach center in the town,” Gerdes said. “We want to build a great city, not just a great church. We want to deal with homelessness, immigrant population, building better schools. For us, it is about the place we live, too.”

The new church facility includes an auditorium, a lobby and children’s areas.

In fall 2010, the congregation began looking for property to build facilities. They bought property and broke ground in 2011.

With as many as 600 to 800 children in attendance each Sunday, the church’s children’s services are bursting at the seams and plans are already in the works for a new kids and students building, Gertes said. The services are held at the same time as adult worship.

“We are already out of space, particulary in our kids’ areas, and in May we started to expand to build a new kids and students building,” Gerdes said.

The kids’ area is divided into nursery, pre-kindergarten and elementary sections and serves children up to fifth-graders. Adult services are for sixth-grade ages and older.

“We really want to teach Jesus on the kid level,” said Gerdes, who is the father of two children. The church does not have a traditional Sunday School or Wednesday night services.

“Where we are a little different, we don’t do a lot of things here at the building, but in small groups at people’s homes,” Gerdes said. “Sometimes, like for summer, teenagers meet here on the weekend.”

The large majority of church members are families with young children, Gerdes said.

“We have a lot of young families starting families, but we are also reaching grandparents — couples that are in their 50s, 60s and 70s,” he said.

A typical Sunday adult service includes a worship time, worship music for about 20 to 25 minutes, an offering time, the message and then response time.

“This is where we do things a little differently,”Gerdes said. “We don’t have a choir, we have a band.

The rock band consists of about 20 to 30 members who play drums, guitar, bass and the piano. The congregation sings along to the contemporary worship songs. There are no hymn books and lyrics are displayed on a screen in the auditorium.

“The songs are about glorifying God - about Jesus. They are still worship songs,” Gerdes said.

Gerdes most often delivers the message, which he calls teaching.

“Primarily, my main responsibility is the vision of church, what our elders feel, and then teaching,” Gerdes said. “If I am not teaching, and someone else is, I am still involved in the message.”

Gerdes was chosen by the church in 2010 using a search firm. He attended a Southern Baptist theological seminary in Texas and later was at a similar non-denominational church in Corpus Christie, Texas, before moving to Georgia.

The lead pastor said the church is still loosely affiliated with the Baptist denomination, although it is non-denominational.

“We still support Baptist missions and theologically, we are conservative,” Gerdes said. “In our ministry we don’t look anything like a Baptist Church, but theologically we are similar.”

Revolution Church was started in Cherokee County by the West Ridge congregation from Dallas, and the congregation originally met at Teasley Middle School, then the Riverstone movie theater complex and later at the Cherokee County Conference Center at the Bluffs.

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