School starts for Sandy Hook kids
by Dave Collins, Associated Press
January 03, 2013 11:15 AM | 838 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
A bus traveling from Newtown, Conn., to Monroe stops in front of 26 angels along the roadside on the first day of classes for Sandy Hook Elementary School students since the Dec. 14 shooting, in Monroe, Conn., Thursday, Jan. 3, 2013. Chalk Hill School in Monroe was overhauled especially for the students from the Sandy Hook School shooting. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill)
A bus traveling from Newtown, Conn., to Monroe stops in front of 26 angels along the roadside on the first day of classes for Sandy Hook Elementary School students since the Dec. 14 shooting, in Monroe, Conn., Thursday, Jan. 3, 2013. Chalk Hill School in Monroe was overhauled especially for the students from the Sandy Hook School shooting. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill)
slideshow
This December 2012 photo provided by The Newtown Bee shows a sign welcoming Sandy Hook Elementary School students, of Newtown, Conn., to the Chalk Hill School campus in neighboring Monroe, Conn. An open house was planned for the Sandy Hook students Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2013 at the former Chalk Hill School, overhauled specially for them. Classes for the Sandy Hook students start there on Thursday. (AP Photo/The Newtown Bee, Andy Hutchison)
This December 2012 photo provided by The Newtown Bee shows a sign welcoming Sandy Hook Elementary School students, of Newtown, Conn., to the Chalk Hill School campus in neighboring Monroe, Conn. An open house was planned for the Sandy Hook students Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2013 at the former Chalk Hill School, overhauled specially for them. Classes for the Sandy Hook students start there on Thursday. (AP Photo/The Newtown Bee, Andy Hutchison)
slideshow
MONROE, Conn. — For her son’s first day of school since last month’s massacre at his Sandy Hook Elementary, Sarah Caron tried to make Thursday as normal as possible. She made his favorite pancakes, and she walked the second-grader to the top of the driveway for the school bus.

But it was harder than usual to say goodbye.

“I hugged him a lot longer than normal, until he said, ‘Mommy, please,’” she said. “And then he got on the bus, and he was OK.”

Her 7-year-old son, William, was among more than 400 students who escaped a gunman’s rampage that killed 20 first-graders and six educators at Sandy Hook on Dec. 14. On Thursday, the returning students settled in at their old, familiar desks but in a different school in a different town.

Returning students, teachers and administrators were met by a large police presence outside their new school in the neighboring town of Monroe, where a middle school that had been shuttered for nearly two years was overhauled and renamed after their old school. Several officers guarded the entrance and checked IDs of parents dropping off children.

Monroe police Lt. Keith White said attendance was very good and the children were getting back to “business as usual.”

“A lot of them were happy to see their friends they hadn’t seen in a while,” he said.

William’s classroom had been across the hall from a first-grade room where children and teacher Victoria Soto died, and he had been nervous about going back to school, Caron said. But an open house Wednesday at the school eased some of his fears.

“They didn’t talk about what happened at all,” she said. “They went in, met up with their teachers, had a little circle time and it was just about trying to get them back into school.”
Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
*We welcome your comments on the stories and issues of the day and seek to provide a forum for the community to voice opinions. All comments are subject to moderator approval before being made visible on the website but are not edited. The use of profanity, obscene and vulgar language, hate speech, and racial slurs is strictly prohibited. Advertisements, promotions, spam, and links to outside websites will also be rejected. Please read our terms of service for full guides