Virginia on edge as economy depends on deficit debate’s outcome
by Sharon Cohen
Associated Press Writer
October 14, 2012 02:32 AM | 713 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, right, introduces his vice presidential running mate, Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan near the decommissioned battleship USS Wisconsin in Norfolk, Va. President Barack Obama and Romney are dueling over the size of government and defense cuts, pouring tens of millions of dollars into this crucial battleground, a state where military spending adds enormous sums to the local economy.<br>The Associated Press
Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, right, introduces his vice presidential running mate, Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan near the decommissioned battleship USS Wisconsin in Norfolk, Va. President Barack Obama and Romney are dueling over the size of government and defense cuts, pouring tens of millions of dollars into this crucial battleground, a state where military spending adds enormous sums to the local economy.
The Associated Press
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LEESBURG, Va. — Amid scenic horse farms, vineyards, Civil War landmarks and quaint shops tucked in historic red-brick buildings, signs of prosperity are plainly visible. The anxiety about the economy, less so — but it’s here.

Talk to the husband and wife who opened a used bookstore last year, and they reveal they first signed one six-month lease, then another, not wanting to lock into anything longer until they were sure they had a viable business.

Or the construction consultant who realized government budgets were shrinking and a full-fledged economic recovery was years away, so it was time to change careers.

Or the restaurant owner who wonders when the uncertainty will fade and people will start spending.

While Virginia escaped the worst of the recession — unemployment peaked at 7.3 percent — uneasiness about the future is in the air. For good reason: The state’s fortunes are tied to the outcome of the deficit debate on Capitol Hill and its outcome could dramatically alter its economy. Unless Congress finds a way to avoid the tax increases and spending cuts that could send the nation barreling over the so-called fiscal cliff early next year, the state could face serious pain.

The cuts could impact federal workers, defense firms, the state’s many military installations and beyond. Virginia is home to the Pentagon, the CIA, Naval Station Norfolk, Fort A.P. Hill, Langley Air Force Base, Marine Corps Base Quantico and more. By one account, more than 200,000 jobs could be vulnerable — more than those lost in the recession

“This would be a punch in the face for the whole state,” says James Koch, an economist at Old Dominion University. “People here have looked at other states such as Florida, Ohio and Nevada and said, ‘Oh, they have it worse.’ Now the worm could turn a bit.”

Against this tense backdrop, President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney are dueling over the size of government and defense cuts, pouring tens of millions of dollars into this crucial battleground, a state where military spending adds enormous sums to the local economy. The winner will claim Virginia’s 13 critical electoral votes — and most likely, better odds for capturing the White House.

Four years ago, Obama broke a 44-year GOP grip on Virginia with a decisive 6.3 point win over John McCain.

The president cobbled together a coalition of minorities, young people and college-educated white voters (women more than men) in the affluent suburbs across the Potomac River from the nation’s capital, a Democratic-leaning, fast-growing area. Here in Loudoun County, for instance, the population skyrocketed 84 percent in the decade ending in 2010.

Obama scored victories, too, in the Hampton Roads region, home to the world’s largest U.S. Naval base in Norfolk, along with many active duty and retired military. It was a stunning defeat for McCain, a Navy veteran.

Changing demographics also made the state friendly territory for Obama. The Latino population in Virginia jumped 92 percent from 2000 to 2010. Minorities now account for 27 percent of eligible voters in this state that was home to the Confederate capital.
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