July tips for ornamentals, fruits, veggies and more
by Marcia Winchester
July 03, 2015 12:12 AM | 205 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Ornamentals ♦ If your hosta and azalea stems have a white powder covering them, it is probably the waxy coating of planthopper insects. They don’t do much damage, but can spread diseases. Spray with garden insecticide if unsightly. ♦ Keep pinching back mums to keep them blooming longer and make them bushier. ♦ Lamb’s ear tends to have their lower leaves die after a heavy rain. This forms ugly mats that will rot stems and roots. Pull away the yellow leaves to keep up airflow. ♦ Fertilize crape myrtles, butterfly bushes, and hydrangeas with 1 Tablespoon of 10-10-10 per foot of height. Fruits and vegetables ♦ Before you spray an insecticide on your vegetables, check the label. Each insecticide has a waiting period after application before you can harvest. ♦ Although tomatoes are self-pollinating, they need movement to transfer pollen. If it is hot and calm for several days, gently shake plants to assure pollen transfer and fruit set. Hot temperatures can interfere with blossom set. ♦ Water stress in sweet potatoes can result in cracked roots. A potassium deficiency causes long, slender roots. Too much nitrogen reduces yield and quality. ♦ Most fertilizer recommendations are for 100 square feet, so keep your garden’s square footage a simple fraction of that. For example, a 4-by-12 foot garden is exactly 50 square feet and would require exactly one half the fertilizer required by a garden of 100 square feet. ♦ Okra pods get tough if allowed to grow too large. Pick regularly. ♦ Mulch strawberries heavily to protect them from heat and drought. ♦ The time of day vegetables are harvested can make a difference in the taste and texture. For sweetness, pick peas and corn late in the day; that’s when they contain the most sugar, especially if the day was cool and sunny. Other vegetables, like lettuce and cucumbers, are crisper and tastier if you harvest them early in the morning before the day’s heat has a chance to wilt and shrivel them. ♦ Start a fall crop of brussel sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower and kale indoors. Outdoors, sow pumpkin, beans, squash, cucumbers, and crowder peas. Plant carrots mid-month. ♦ Pick squash regularly to keep up production. If the vines wilt, check the base of the stem for “sawdust”. This means the plant has squash bores in the stem. Remove infected plants (thus removing the bores) and plant new seeds. It is good to change your planting location to hopefully prevent the new plants from being attacked. ♦ Sunflowers are ready to harvest when the back of the head turns brown. ♦ Keep an eye out for tomato hornworm. They can do enormous damage overnight. They also attack Nicotiana. When you see damage, check under leaves and stems to find them. Hand pick to dispose of them. ♦ Don’t plant all your beans at once. If you stagger the plantings every two weeks you will have fresh beans longer. Soak bean seeds overnight before planting for faster germination. ♦ Use bamboo poles to form a large teepee-like structure. Use twine to create a trellis though all but one section of the teepee. Plant pole beans along the twine. Watch the beans grow into a house that kids love to play in. The section that was not tied with the twine is the entrance to the bean teepee. Miscellaneous ♦ If you keep your houseplants indoors all summer, keep them out of the draft of the air conditioner. Plants react to an air conditioner’s cool air in various ways. Some drop their leaves, others don’t bloom well and some fail to bloom at all. Marcia Winchester is one of many UGA Master Gardener Extension Volunteers of Cherokee County. For more information or questions contact the Cherokee County Extension Office at (770) 721-7803 or for upcoming seminars follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/cherokeemastergardeners.
Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
American Legion to send youth for Boys Nation program
by Jessica Lindley
July 03, 2015 12:10 AM | 209 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
From left, Eric Eternod, Blake Heyer, Christopher Gouin, Porter Enloe, Griffen Hedrick, Neil Pauquette, Russell Smith, Graham Smith and James Shaw, not pictured, participated in the Department of Georgia’s American Legion Boys State Program. <br> Special to the Tribune
From left, Eric Eternod, Blake Heyer, Christopher Gouin, Porter Enloe, Griffen Hedrick, Neil Pauquette, Russell Smith, Graham Smith and James Shaw, not pictured, participated in the Department of Georgia’s American Legion Boys State Program.
Special to the Tribune
slideshow
Woodstock-area teen Christopher Gouin is heading to The American Legion Boys Nation program in Washington D.C. after being selected as a Boys Nation senator. Russell Smith of Canton was selected as a Boys Nation senator alternate. Gouin, Smith and seven other local teens participated in the weeklong Department of Georgia’s American Legion Boys State program at the Riverside Military Academy in Gainesville from June 14 to 20. American Legion Post 316 in Woodstock sponsored the group. “The Boys State program is a comprehensive, weeklong program in how state and local governments function,” said American Legion Post 316 Commander Irma Martin. “It is a program where the attendees take part in forming a mythical 51st state. During the week, they get the opportunity to learn the political process and build their state from the city, county and state levels.” To form a 51st state, Gouin said some 400 Boys State attendees had to start from the ground up, first creating a city government. “Upon arriving, you are split up into 16 different cities, four counties and two parties,” Gouin said. “Eventually, you get to the state level. Basically, if Georgia’s government didn’t exist, this is how we would set it up.” During the first day of the program, Gouin said mayors, council members and the clerks were elected. “From there, we moved up to the county level and elected state representatives and court judges,” he said. “From there, we moved to the state level. That’s where the lieutenant governor office and state senator offices were elected.” Gouin was named lieutenant governor and Boys Nation senator for the state, Georgia Boys State. Six other Woodstock-area teens also were elected to positions. Smith, of River Ridge High School, was named a county sheriff; Blake Heyer, of Woodstock High School, served on a City Council and served as a state senator; Porter Enloe, of The King’s Academy, was named the state commissioner of insurance; Griffen Hedrick, of River Ridge High School, was a state senator; Neil Pauquette, of River Ridge High School, was a county Superior Court clerk; and Graham Smith, of River Ridge High School, served on a City Council. James Shaw, of Etowah High School, and Eric Eternod, of Woodstock High School, also participated in the weeklong program. “Boys State is not well known, but it is a really good opportunity to experience government and what our citizenship entails,” Gouin said. “We got to experience different levels of government; we got to rally the cities and counties behind the candidates.” Gouin will now move on to The American Legion Boys Nation program, where he and 97 other teens will experience government on the federal level. The program runs from July 17 to 24. “I haven’t experienced it yet, but I am really looking forward it,” he said. “We all go as senators, and we basically simulate the senate of the United States of America. The only thing that is unrealistic is that we elect the president. We pass bills, form committees and are briefed on national security.” Gouin attends the Johnson Ferry Christian Academy, where he is enrolled in the college preparatory program and has been a National Honor Society member since 2013. He is dual enrolled at Truett-McConnell College, where he is on the president’s list and is also dual enrolled at Georgia Perimeter College or (Georgia Tech). Gouin has been involved in The Kings’ Academy Army Junior ROTC program in Woodstock since 2012 and is expected to be a company co-battalion commander and co-executive officer during the 2015-16 school year. He said he would like to attend West Point upon graduating and pursue a career in the military. “As of right now, politics is not on my radar, but God takes me where he wants me to go,” Gouin said.
Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
From left, Eric Eternod, Blake Heyer, Christopher Gouin, Porter Enloe, Griffen Hedrick, Neil Pauquette, Russell Smith, Graham Smith and James Shaw, not pictured, participated in the Department of Georgia’s American Legion Boys State Program. <br> Special to the Tribune
From left, Eric Eternod, Blake Heyer, Christopher Gouin, Porter Enloe, Griffen Hedrick, Neil Pauquette, Russell Smith, Graham Smith and James Shaw, not pictured, participated in the Department of Georgia’s American Legion Boys State Program.
Special to the Tribune
slideshow
Holly Springs seeking input on redevelopment of its downtown
by Jessica Lindley
July 03, 2015 12:00 AM | 403 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
As Holly Springs continues to make strides in the redevelopment of its downtown district, it is seeking input from the people who call the city home. Residents are encouraged to attend a public input meeting Monday from 5 to 7 p.m. in the council chambers at 3235 Holly Springs Parkway. Representatives from Bleakly Advisory Group, a real estate and economic advisory firm, and Wakefield Beasley & Associates, a design firm, will be on hand to answer any questions. “They want input from residents as far as what they would like to see downtown and then will have dialogue with them about the marketing study and content report that they prepared,” City Manager Rob Logan said. “They want to hear what residents like, don’t like and what they would like to see in downtown Holly Springs.” The downtown area is something of a blank slate and has been in the works since the city created a Livable Centers Initiative in 2004. “The area in question is a piece of property owned by the city of Holly Springs and the Holly Springs Downtown Development Authority near the intersection of Hickory Road and Palm Street,” Logan said. The property is about 22 acres and a majority of the redeveloped downtown will be on the north side of Hickory Road. Because the city has to build its downtown from the ground up, the last several years have been spent acquiring land and working with architects to develop a master plan. During that time, the city also constructed a new fire station on Hickory Road, developed a downtown parking plan, made repairs to the train depot, and updated the zoning ordinances and future land use maps. After more than a decade, the plan is now starting to take shape, with city leaders redirecting their focus back to the original Livable Centers Initiative plan from 2004. A marketing study performed by Bleakly Advisory Group contains many elements of the original plan, such as a three-sided downtown with a park and City Hall in the center. Additional takeaways from the marketing study include attracting businesses downtown, addressing parking hurdles and traffic congestion, designing a streetscape and housing styles such as single-family, active adult and loft living. Logan said the marketing study and concept plan would be presented at the public input meeting and also at the council meeting following at 7 p.m.
Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
Secretary, dog retire from Canton Fire Department at the same time
by Carolyn Mathews
July 03, 2015 12:00 AM | 352 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Retiring secretary Sandra Degges shows fire dog Charity items from her own retirement package as Charity’s handler, Fire Marshal Roger Bailey, watches.<br> Staff-Carolyn Mathews
Retiring secretary Sandra Degges shows fire dog Charity items from her own retirement package as Charity’s handler, Fire Marshal Roger Bailey, watches.
Staff-Carolyn Mathews
slideshow
The Canton Fire Department thanked two team members for their hard work Tuesday at a retirement ceremony. Fire Department Administrative Assistant Sandra Degges is retiring after 16 years on the job, and, although fire dog Charity will still come to the station, she’s given up her stop-drop-and-roll duties. Degges said she doesn’t mind celebrating retirement with Charity. “I’ll miss everyone,” she said. She does a little of everything, acting as a secretary to Chief Dean Floyd and his administrative staff, as well as helping with the fire marshal’s and the fire inspection offices, she said. Fire Marshal Roger Bailey said not many fire houses have a real fire dog, and Charity will continue to come to the fire station daily. “Her hours are Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.,” Degges said. “At about 4:30 p.m. she starts standing by the door, ready to go home.” Charity lives with Bailey and his family. Two visitors Charity and Degges received at the reception were Capt. Shannon Wyatt, who brought Degges a bouquet of flowers, and Mickey Mider. Mider found Charity and rescued her. “She meandered into my yard — she was in bad shape, covered in red clay and had just had a litter of puppies,” Mider said. “The vet said she had several litters and she’s a thoroughbred Dalmatian.” Floyd speculated maybe Charity was used as a breeding dog for her purebred puppies. Bailey said Charity loves children, and in her younger days could teach the stop, drop and roll techniques with ease. “I would just let her loose in class — she loves kids,” he said. “She’d lay down in the middle of the kids and let them pet her. Her favorite thing was to be able to run outside with them.” Bailey shared how the tradition of Dalmatians in fire houses began. “They are a breed that has a special relationship with horses — they get along well,” he said. “Since they are aggressive, fire departments would keep them at the station to keep thieves from stealing the valuable fire horses that drew the water wagons.” Degges said she plans to spend time gardening since she will be home more often, and she’s planning to travel to Palm Beach at the end of this month because her daughter is having a baby — her third grandchild. Degges said she is excited to meet the baby, especially because the parents decided not to find out if it’s a boy or girl before birth.
Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
*We welcome your comments on the stories and issues of the day and seek to provide a forum for the community to voice opinions. All comments are subject to moderator approval before being made visible on the website but are not edited. The use of profanity, obscene and vulgar language, hate speech, and racial slurs is strictly prohibited. Advertisements, promotions, spam, and links to outside websites will also be rejected. Please read our terms of service for full guides