Government entitlements are not the answer
January 06, 2013 12:00 AM | 778 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
DEAR EDITOR:

Christ said the poor will always be with us. We are seeing this today and have seen it for years past.

Government money and entitlements don’t seem to make much difference except to lock those in that situation into that level of life, a comfort zone of sorts.

To be poor is not merely a financial condition, but mental and attitudinal as well. When I come in contact with some living in poor conditions, having trouble making payment on bills or rent or even food, I am confronted with the thought “when, where and how will this all end.”

Most often, it is a single parent, the father nowhere to be found or not contributing to his responsibility of caring for his children.

The single parent, if working, is barely making ends meet, if at all, and the children are suffering from the lack of a two-parent family.

Almost always, they are dependent on government support in some form. It is well documented that children of a single-parent family (with exceptions) are most likely to remain in that condition as adults.

It is the family unit that is so needed and missing in today’s society. With a proper family unit comes an appreciation of education, a sense of some discipline and moral values.

But what we are seeing in our leadership in government is a move from values and a move toward secularism.

Somehow we need to hold fathers responsible for, at the least, the financial support of their children without all the red tape.

We need to educate the parents on the need to keep children in school and how to teach or instill in the children, the desire and knowledge that they can do better with education and training and that they do not have to stay in those conditions.

We may never eliminate poverty, but we can reduce the number of those in poverty.

Further, poverty is a relative matter. Growing up I was introduced by a cousin as his rich cousin, although my parents struggled as many others did to make ends meet.

We were, however, blessed with family; uncles and aunts, mother and father, brothers and sisters, a true family life and we knew we were expected to do well in school and to get an education.

What we expect of others is what we will get. This is true in school, business or sports. Our parents also valued faith and love of this country.

John Cory

Woodstock

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