Massive manhunt underway for former L.A. Police officer
by Shaya Tayefe Mohajer, Associated Press and Tami Abdollah, Associated Press
February 08, 2013 12:00 AM | 1180 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print

Police respond in Riverside, Calif., early Thursday morning after one officer was killed and another critically wounded in a shootout with a murder suspect. Police were searching for a former Los Angeles police officer sought for three killings — and who threatened to kill police. <br>The Associated Press
Police respond in Riverside, Calif., early Thursday morning after one officer was killed and another critically wounded in a shootout with a murder suspect. Police were searching for a former Los Angeles police officer sought for three killings — and who threatened to kill police.
The Associated Press
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LOS ANGELES — An ex-Los Angeles police officer who authorities say went on a deadly shooting rampage to punish those he blamed for his firing killed three people, setting off a manhunt that stirred fear across several states and Mexico.

The search for Christopher Dorner focused late Thursday on Big Bear Lake, about 80 miles east of Los Angeles, where police found a burned-out pickup truck that belonged to Christopher Dorner. San Bernardino County Sheriff John McMahon said officers were going door to door looking for him.

Throughout the day, thousands of heavily armed officers patrolled highways in the state, while some stood guard outside the homes of people police say Dorner vowed to attack in an angry rant posted online. Electronic billboards that usually alert motorists about the commute urged them to call 911 if they saw him.

“I will bring unconventional and asymmetrical warfare” to Los Angeles Police Department officers, on or off duty, said the manifesto. It also asserted: “Unfortunately, I will not be alive to see my name cleared. That’s what this is about, my name. A man is nothing without his name.”

Dorner, 33, had multiple weapons including an assault rifle, said Los Angeles police Chief Charlie Beck, who urged him to surrender at an unusual press conference in an underground room at police headquarters where there was more security than normal.

“Of course he knows what he’s doing, we trained him. He was also a member of the Armed Forces,” he said. “It is extremely worrisome and scary.”

The nearly 10,000-member LAPD dispatched some of its officers to protect more than 40 potential targets across the region on Thursday. The department also pulled officers from motorcycle duty, fearing they would make for easy targets.

“I never had the opportunity to have a family of my own, I’m terminating yours,” the manifesto said.

At one point, officers guarding one location mistakenly opened fire on a pickup truck believing it matched the description of Dorner’s dark colored 2005 Nissan Titan, injuring two innocent occupants.

The chief said there had been a “night of extreme tragedy in the Los Angeles area” and that the department was taking measures to ensure the safety of officers and their families.

The search for Dorner, who was fired from the LAPD in 2008 for making false statements, began after he was linked to a weekend killing in which one of the victims was the daughter of a former police captain who had represented him during the disciplinary hearing.

Monica Quan and her fiance, Keith Lawrence, were found shot in their car at a parking structure at their condominium on Sunday in Irvine. Quan, 28, was an assistant women’s basketball coach at Cal State Fullerton. Lawrence, 27, was a public safety officer at the University of Southern California.

Police said Dorner implicated himself in the couple’s killings in the manifesto posted on Facebook. They believe he wrote it because there were details in it only he would know.

In the post, Dorner wrote that he knew he would be vilified by the LAPD and the news media, but that “unfortunately, this is a necessary evil that I do not enjoy but must partake and complete for substantial change to occur within the LAPD and reclaim my name.”

Dorner was with the LAPD from 2005 until 2008, when he was fired for making false statements.

Quan’s father, a former LAPD captain who became a lawyer in retirement, represented Dorner in front of the Board of Rights, a tribunal that ruled against Dorner, police said. Randal Quan retired in 2002 and later served as chief of police at Cal Poly Pomona before he started practicing law. Quan did not immediately return a message seeking comment.

According to documents from a court of appeals hearing in October 2011, Dorner was fired from the LAPD after he made a complaint against his field training officer, Sgt. Teresa Evans. Dorner said that in the course of an arrest, Evans kicked suspect Christopher Gettler, a schizophrenic with severe dementia.

Richard Gettler, the schizophrenic man’s father, gave testimony that supported Dorner’s claim. After his son was returned on July 28, 2007, Richard Gettler asked “if he had been in a fight because his face was puffy” and his son responded that he was kicked twice in the chest by a police officer.

After his dismissal, Dorner said in his online rant that he lost everything, including his relationships with his mother, sister and close friends.

“Self-preservation is no longer important to me. I do not fear death as I died long ago,” the manifesto. “I was told by my mother that sometimes bad things happen to good people. I refuse to accept that.”

Dorner said he would use all of his training to avoid capture and track his targets.

In addition to police work, Dorner served in the Naval Reserves, earning a rifle marksman ribbon and pistol expert medal. He served in a naval undersea warfare unit and various aviation training units, according to military records, and took a leave from the LAPD and deployed to Bahrain in 2006 and 2007.

“I will utilize every bit of small arms training, demolition, ordinance and survival training I’ve been given,” the manifesto read. “You have misjudged a sleeping giant.”

As officers searched for Dorner, there was a report of a shooting in Corona that involved two LAPD officers working a security detail, police said. A resident pointed out Dorner to the officers who followed until his pickup stopped and the driver got out and fired a rifle at them. A bullet grazed an officer’s head.

Later, two officers on routine patrol in neighboring Riverside were ambushed at a stop light by a motorist who drove up next to them and opened fire with a rifle. One died and the other was seriously wounded but was expected to survive, Riverside police Chief Sergio Diaz said.

Diaz said news organizations should withhold the officers’ names because the suspect had made clear that he considers police and their families “fair game.”

The hunt for Dorner led to two errant shootings in the pre-dawn darkness Thursday.

LAPD officers guarding a “target” named in the posting shot and wounded two women in suburban Torrance who were in a pickup but were not involved, authorities said. Beck said one woman was in stable condition with two gunshot wounds and the other was being released after treatment.

“Tragically we believe this was a case of mistaken identity by the officers,” Beck said.

Minutes later, Torrance officers responding to a report of gunshots encountered a dark pickup matching the description of Dorner’s, police said. A collision occurred and the officers fired on the pickup. The unidentified driver was not hit and it turned out not to be the suspect vehicle, they said.

In San Diego, where police say Dorner tied up an elderly man and unsuccessfully tried to steal his boat Wednesday night, Naval Base Point Loma was locked down Thursday after a Navy worker reported seeing someone who resembled Dorner.

Navy Cmdr. Brad Fagan said officials don’t believe he was on base Thursday but had checked into a base hotel on Tuesday and left the next day without checking out. Numerous agencies guarded the base. Fagan said Dorner was honorably discharged and that his last day in the Navy was last Friday.

Nevada authorities also looked for Dorner because he owns a house nine miles from the Las Vegas Strip, according to authorities and property records.

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