Digital 3-D atlas of brain reveals tiny details
by Malcolm Ritter, AP Science Writer
June 20, 2013 05:00 PM | 751 views | 0 0 comments | 31 31 recommendations | email to a friend | print
In this photo provided by Katrin Amunts, Karl Zilles, Alan C. Evans, researchers use a microtome to cut sections from a brain preserved in paraffin wax into slivers 20-micrometers thick, resulting in over 7,400 slices. A digital three-dimensional model called "BigBrain" was produced from the thousands of sections. Its resolution is finer than a human hair, so it can reveal clusters of brain cells and even some large individual cells. It is being made available to scientists around the world. The researchers, from Germany and Canada, reported their work Thursday, June 20, 2013 in the journal Science. (AP Photo/Katrin Amunts, Karl Zilles, Alan C. Evans)
In this photo provided by Katrin Amunts, Karl Zilles, Alan C. Evans, researchers use a microtome to cut sections from a brain preserved in paraffin wax into slivers 20-micrometers thick, resulting in over 7,400 slices. A digital three-dimensional model called "BigBrain" was produced from the thousands of sections. Its resolution is finer than a human hair, so it can reveal clusters of brain cells and even some large individual cells. It is being made available to scientists around the world. The researchers, from Germany and Canada, reported their work Thursday, June 20, 2013 in the journal Science. (AP Photo/Katrin Amunts, Karl Zilles, Alan C. Evans)
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This image made from video provided by researchers shows a highly-detailed image of the hippocampus region of the human brain. The digital three-dimensional model called "BigBrain" was produced from the thousands of sections made from the brain of a 65-year-old woman. Its resolution is finer than a human hair, so it can reveal clusters of brain cells and even some large individual cells. It is being made available to scientists around the world. The researchers, from Germany and Canada, reported their work Thursday, June 20, 2013 in the journal Science. (AP Photo/Montreal Neurological Institute/McGill University, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine/Research Centre Juelich, and National Research Council of Canada)
This image made from video provided by researchers shows a highly-detailed image of the hippocampus region of the human brain. The digital three-dimensional model called "BigBrain" was produced from the thousands of sections made from the brain of a 65-year-old woman. Its resolution is finer than a human hair, so it can reveal clusters of brain cells and even some large individual cells. It is being made available to scientists around the world. The researchers, from Germany and Canada, reported their work Thursday, June 20, 2013 in the journal Science. (AP Photo/Montreal Neurological Institute/McGill University, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine/Research Centre Juelich, and National Research Council of Canada)
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NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists have a new brain atlas to help them study their favorite organ. It's a digital, three-dimensional model called "BigBrain."

Its resolution is finer than a human hair, so it can reveal clusters of brain cells and even some large individual cells. It is being made available to scientists around the world.

To make the atlas, researchers sliced a cadaver brain from a 65-year-old woman into 7,400 thin sections, stained them to reveal tiny features, and photographed each one. Then they used computers to combine the data into a 3-D digital model.

The idea of thin-slicing a brain to study its anatomy is not new. In fact, complete bodies of a man and a woman were sliced and photographed about 20 years ago to create an anatomy reference called the Visible Human Project.

For the new brain-mapping project, the researchers chose the woman's brain for no special reason other than it was basically healthy, said Katrin Amunts of Heinrich Heine University Duesseldorf in Germany.

She is lead author of a report on the atlas published Thursday in the journal Science. Scientists have begun mapping data from other brain studies onto the new model to gain new insights, said senior author Karl Zilles of the Juelich Aachen Research Alliance in Juelich, Germany.

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Science: http://www.sciencemag.org



Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

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