Daughter’s life journey is reason for celebration
by Chris Collett, columnist
May 03, 2014 12:59 AM | 2647 views | 0 0 comments | 38 38 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Chris Collett<br>Columnist
Chris Collett
Columnist
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My little girl Lindsey is graduating from Reinhardt University on Saturday. I call her little girl even though she is 25. But I don’t call her by name. She is and forever will be Pooh Bear.

I remember when she was born it was my prayer to live long enough to at least see her graduate high school. Then my prayer was to live long enough to see her graduate college. So far, so good.

Even though selfish, it would be nice to live a few years longer to see where her road leads her.

Every parent worth their weight in salt wants to see their children do better than they did. We want them to have more, love more, laugh more and succeed beyond anything we ever accomplished.

Pooh Bear is one of the lucky ones. She should be able to do all of the above. Her daddy didn’t exactly set the bar too high.

She has no memory of the days without cellphones. When I was growing up we had a rotary dial phone with a cord. We were on a party line with several other families. That meant that if you picked up the receiver and someone else was talking, you just had to hang up and try again later. People did hang up and wait their turn. People had respect for their neighbors.

Pooh Bear has no memory of the days before computers. Her generation grew up on them. That’s one reason the young generation excels in the workplace. They know more about technology than we do.

When growing up in rural Cherokee County, we managed just fine without computers. There was very little in the house for entertainment with the exception of the television that would get three channels on a good day.

Therefore, we looked outside for our entertainment. We caught lightning bugs. We would go to the creek and catch spring lizards. Of course, we didn’t know what to do with them when we caught them. So even with spring lizards we practiced the catch and release philosophy.

We rode bicycles without a helmet. We played ball. We invented games. And we stayed outside until we were made to come in.

Even though I am glad Lindsey grew up in a time with modern technology, there is an ounce of sadness that she will never know the world her daddy grew up in. It wasn’t necessarily a better world. It was different.

The technology generation has had the world at their fingertips through the Internet since they could walk. My generation had encyclopedias.

My generation communicated through conversations. The technology generation communicates through email and text messages. Say what you will, many times messages get crossed up when sent in writing.

If my daddy had something to say to a man, he looked him in the eye and said it. So as much good as technology has brought to our lives, it has also brought some bad through abuse.

It has made it easy for cowardly people to seem brave because they are able to speak their mind without looking in to the eyes of the receiver. It has encouraged name calling and bullying because of being able to do so within the confines of one’s home.

Daddy wasn’t always right. But he wasn’t always wrong either. He taught me to stand up for myself in the face of whatever I might be facing. And if he thought for a minute that I confronted someone through technology as opposed to face to face, he would have been disappointed.

I am proud of my child’s generation because I believe there are many fine people in that age group. But I can’t help but also feel sorry for them that they never knew a simpler time.

I have taught her about all I know. Of course that was accomplished a while back. But working for a man such as Bryan Reynolds, I know she is learning things from him that her daddy could never teach her.

People ask me all the time how and why I write these columns. I may have nothing in the world to leave Pooh Bear when I go, but she will have my columns.

Most importantly, she and I share one thing that has never changed throughout all of the changes in our world.

We share our belief in God. He has never changed. And He never will.

Chris Collett is a lifelong resident of Cherokee County.
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